Mesesso Foundation Blog

January 29, 2009 at 4:48 am 2 comments

Mesesso now has a blog!!!! In the next few days I will be adding more news and updates on what Mesesso is doing for 2009.

Advertisements

Entry filed under: Uncategorized.

Hello world! Sponsored Girls at Soresso

2 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Leisa  |  March 25, 2009 at 5:44 am

    I met Rod Boone in Ethiopia. My Mother and I were apart of the humanitarian group that he first traveled with to Ethiopia. You can read all you can about the plight of the people there, you can watch on TV of the great need there, but “NOTHING” can compare to being there, and seeing it with your own eyes. You may think; “There are people right here in America that need help.” And you’re right, there is. But, when one truly cares about another persons plight, geography should not be an issue. We saw poverty that cannot be adequately described. There is nothing in America that one could really compare to what is found there. I could describe the look of the utter poverty that is everywhere. No book or TV could adequately describe what I saw in the eyes of the people there. In many of the villages we went to, there was no TV, no books. It was like stepping back in time a thousand years. So, in every sense of the word, we were the “first” white people they had ever seen. We would be instantly surrounded by children. The custom there when greeting one another, is to grasp hands and they kiss your cheeks three times, four for greater affection. Often they bow first. I am tall, so I would kneel down to be able to look into their faces when greeting them. I would be literally surrounded by children waiting to greet me. Each with beaming faces. They would stroke my arms, over and over. My friend Henock told me that they were telling me that I was beautiful. I have blonde hair, and all I could feel was sweet little fingers, respectfully touching my hair, and then sweet giggles would surround me. Often I would just flip my head over, so they all could touch it. Then again I would be smothered by kisses. When you look into the faces of their parents or guardians you’ll see a look of “pure” humility and gratitude. They look upon you in such a way that you could never be fully worthy of their gratitude. You hear the saying; ” A thirst for knowledge?” There you see it in every one of their faces, young and old. Girls don’t get to be children. They’re married off at YOUNG ages. Often to a man not of their choosing. I will never forget the look in one young girl’s eyes. She was maybe 13, pregnant, carrying a baby on her back. She walked past me, and our eyes met. She had a look of hardship and sorrow that will forever haunt me. Girls like her are “everywhere” there. The woman there work likes slaves, while carrying their children on their backs. We were in homes that sheltered an entire family, that was not fit for pigs. Yet, their hospitality would completely overwhelm you. Before I left for Ethiopia, I was worried about what I had to offer. I felt inadequate. It was only because of my Mother that I was even able to go. I have no material means. No connections. No special talents or abilties. People that go on humanitarian trips think at first that they are the ones who are going to go and give to others. This is what I learned…all that was needed was a loving, willing heart. I left in hopes of giving something to the people of Ethiopia. I gave a little…but I received a LOT. I left, knowing that they gave me FAR more than what I gave them. I realized that it wasn’t just us that had something to offer them, they most certainly had much to offer us. Here in our so called “modern” we have lost much, that we don’t even realize. And as you meet the Ethiopian people and are welcomed by them, and you see the love that they so freely give, to family, to friends, and even to complete strangers that could not look more different than them, you will realize very quickly we have much to learn from them. My family and I live off of very limited means. So, we did car washes to earn the money to be Mesesso sponsors. Our family faces the same challenges as many face, especially in these hard times.
    We really struggle fiancially. I struggle with serious health problems that won’t allow me to work outside the home. It can feel overwhelming. But, what joy it brings my whole family to know because of our small, simple efforts, a beautiful girl named Selamawit is getting a “good” education, uniforms, school supplies, shoes, medical care…a future, a voice, the gift of “hope.” Contact the Mesesso foundation, become a sponsor. It is an AMAZING organization. Ran by amazing people, whom I have met, and who I have grown to deeply respect. They have integrity, and are deeply devoted. Make a “real” difference and become a Mesesso sponsor…you WON’T be sorry…

    Reply
  • 2. Leisa McKane  |  March 25, 2009 at 6:06 am

    I met Rod Boone in Ethiopia. My Mother and I were apart of the humanitarian group that he first traveled with to Ethiopia. You can read all you can about the plight of the people there, you can watch on TV of the great need there, but “NOTHING” can compare to being there, and seeing it with your own eyes. You may think; “There are people right here in America that need help.” And you’re right, there is. But, when one truly cares about another persons plight, geography should not be an issue. We saw poverty that cannot be adequately described. There is nothing in America that one could really compare to what is found there. I could describe the look of the utter poverty that is everywhere. But, no book or TV show could adequately describe what I saw in the eyes of the people there. In many of the villages we went to, there was no electricty, no books. It was like stepping back in time a thousand years. So, in every sense of the word, we were the “first” white people they had ever seen. We would be instantly surrounded by children. The custom there when greeting one another, is to grasp hands and they kiss your cheeks three times, four for greater affection. Often they bow first. I am tall, so I would kneel down to be able to look into the childrens faces when greeting them. I would be literally surrounded by children waiting to greet me. Each with beaming faces. They would stroke my arms, over and over. My friend Henock told me that they were telling me that I was beautiful. I have blonde hair, and all I could feel was sweet little fingers, respectfully touching my hair, and then sweet giggles would surround me. Often I would just flip my head over, so they all could touch it. Then again I would be smothered by kisses. When you look into the faces of their parents or guardians you’ll see a look of “pure” humility and gratitude. They look upon you in such a way, that you could never be fully worthy of their gratitude. You hear the saying; ” A thirst for knowledge?” There you see it in every one of their faces, young and old. Girls don’t get to be children. They’re married off at YOUNG ages. Often to a man not of their choosing. I will never forget the look in one young girl’s eyes. She was maybe 13, pregnant, carrying a baby on her back. She walked past me, and our eyes met. She had a look of hardship and sorrow that will forever haunt me. Girls like her are “everywhere” there. The woman there work likes slaves, while carrying their children on their backs. We were in homes that sheltered an entire family, that was not fit for pigs. Yet, their hospitality would completely overwhelm you. Before I left for Ethiopia, I was worried about what I had to offer. I felt inadequate. It was only because of my Mother that I was even able to go. I have no material means. No connections. No special talents or abilties. People that go on humanitarian trips think at first that they are the ones who are going to go and give to others. This is what I learned…all that was needed was a loving, willing heart. I left in hopes of giving something to the people of Ethiopia. I gave a little…but I received a LOT. I left, knowing that they gave me FAR more than what I gave them. I realized that it wasn’t just us that had something to offer them, they most certainly had much to offer us. Here in our so called “modern” world, we have lost much, that we don’t even realize. I hadn’t…until I went to Ethiopia. As you meet the Ethiopian people, see their traditions,when you are welcomed by them. You’ll see the love that they so freely give, to family, to friends, and even to complete strangers that could not look more different than them. It the midst of true hardship you will see joy, kindness and goodness in their faces. What little they have, they are very quick to share. They honor and maintain centuries old traditions. Then you will realize very quickly we have much to learn from them. My family and I live off of very limited means. So, we did car washes to earn the money to be Mesesso sponsors. Our family faces the same challenges as many face, especially in these hard times.
    We really struggle fiancially. I struggle with serious health problems that won’t allow me to work outside the home. It can feel overwhelming. But, what joy it brings my whole family to know because of our small, simple efforts, a beautiful girl named Selamawit is getting a “good” education, uniforms, school supplies, shoes, medical care…a future, a voice, the gift of “hope.” Contact the Mesesso foundation, become a sponsor. It is an AMAZING organization. Ran by amazing people, whom I have met, and who I have grown to deeply respect. They have integrity, and are deeply devoted, and they have great vison. Make a “real” difference and become a Mesesso sponsor…

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Trackback this post  |  Subscribe to the comments via RSS Feed


Calendar

January 2009
M T W T F S S
    Feb »
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031  

Most Recent Posts


%d bloggers like this: